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Your Ultimate Guide to Pediatric CME Credits

Physicians are always studying for something. Whether you’re taking your boards or continuing education, there are so many things to do and so many tasks to handle.

We see opportunities pop up for CME (Continuing Medical Education) credits all the time. Unfortunately, they’re never as convenient as they should be, and worse—they’re expensive, or they offer too few credits for too much work. Also, CME credits are not all the same! It’s hard to keep track of what counts as what.

We’re here to take all of the doubt and uncertainty out of CME credits.

What Are the Different Types of CME Credits?

There are two types of CME credits. They differ based on the way they’re administered and in the way that you’re required to report them. The categories are:

  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™
  • AMA PRA Category 2 Credits™

What’s the Difference?

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit

AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ are the most commonly accepted form of CME credits. They are managed by the American Medical Association (AMA) and reward you with the Physicians Recognition Award (PRA). To earn these credits, physicians must engage in learning activities that have been accredited by one of two organizations: the Accreditation Council for Continuing Education (ACCME) or an ACCME-recognized state medical society.

There are many accredited providers of CMEs out there. The types of activities in which you can earn CMEs will fall under one of two categories: Live Activities or Enduring Material. As the name suggests, Live Activities are any activities that you attend in a live capacity. Enduring Material includes any activity that is not live and can endure over time. Meaning, the material appears in print or was previously recorded.

When you’re checking to determine whether an activity is certified for an AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™, look for this statement:

“The [name of accredited CME provider] designates this [learning format] for a maximum of [number of credits] AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.”

What Are AMA PRA Category 2 Credits?

AMA PRA Category 2 Credits are sometimes referred to as “self-study” CME credits. These credits are given for activities that are not recognized as Category 1 credits. WARNING! Physicians are responsible for documenting and keeping track of all their Category 2 credits! You will not receive documentation about the CME credit from the accredited organization. Additionally, documentation should include the type of activity, subject matter, dates, and the number of credits claimed.

These activities must meet strict guidelines from the AMA definition of CMEs, comply with AMA ethical opinions, and not be promotional in nature.

Pediatrician working on laptop

How Many CME Credits Do I Need?

The total number of CME credits that you need per year varies from state to state, but the amount is typically 100 CME credits within a 1- to 2-year span. Check with your state medical association to get the exact number.

Acquiring 100 credits can be daunting! It can take multiple, week-long conferences to earn the required CME credits, or it could take countless 3-credit courses—taken over evenings and lunchtime seminars. CME credits are a necessity, but they’re far from convenient.

What is the Easiest Way to Get CME Credits?

The easiest way to get your pediatric CME credits is through the Pediatrics Board Review CME Edition of the All Access Pass.

Here are the benefits of getting CME through Pediatrics Board Review:

  • We make it extremely easy for you to claim your CME credits through our easy-to-use CME portal. You will go through a short assessment and get your credits immediately in an efficient, user-friendly manner.
  • We offer over 200 CME credits. You can mix and match between hardcopy books, an audio course, a video course and even live ASK THE EXPERT webinars. You can literally pick from our numerous formats to get exactly what you want. Remember, you typically only need 100 CME credits, so 200 is an abundance of riches. Also, you do NOT have to claim all of your CME at once. So, if you time your membership and CME activities appropriately, one 12-month membership can give you all of the CME credit you’ll need for TWO cycles of CME!
  • You don’t have to rush to get to an evening seminar or spend a week at a convention. It’s all right there in your hands, in your home, or at work.
  • The resources are proven to be effective and give you excellent continuing pediatric medical education. For pediatricians studying for the ABP Initial Certification exam, or the Maintenance of Certification (MOC) exam, our estimated first-time pass rate has been approximately 99% for many years in a row.
  • PBR’s lectures and webinars are designed by Dr. Ashish Goyal, a pediatrician who knows how to teach. The content is always provided in an easy-to-follow and easy-to-understand format, and PBR has frequently been praised for its ability to “simplify the complex.”
  • You get all the expertise, but with less reading, better understanding, and greater retention.
  • It comes with a 100% Money-Back First-Time Guarantee. We mean it.
  • Personalized support and camaraderie is available through a private, online forum of members of the PBR community.

How Can I Best Use My CME Budget?

We make it easy to maximize your CME budget by giving you the best value for your money. Whether it’s a question involving how to pay, who should pay, or even custom documentation needed to get approval of the CME purchase, we can help you.

Plus, we can customize your rebate to help you maximize your budget, your method of payment, your professional expenses for your tax return, and more! Rebates range from $100 to $2000.

Can I Also Get ABP MOC Points for Participating in CME Activities?

With the All Access Pass, you not only get AMA PRA Category 1 credits, but if you are board certified, then you are also entitled to ABP MOC Part 2 Points. PBR’s CME activities qualify you for both requirements with one product.

Can I Split Up the All Access Pass Into More than One Year?

Yes! The CME Edition (of the All Access Pass) offers over 200 AMA PRA Category 1 credits. If you only need some of these credits for your current accreditation cycle, you can save the remaining credits for the next cycle—as long as it’s within 12 months of your membership’s start date.

So, for example, if you only need to earn 100 credits this year, then you can use the CME Edition of the All Access Pass and claim 100 CME credits this year, and claim the remaining 100 credits in January of next year's cycle.

Conclusion

You need your CME credits from somewhere, so why not get them in the most convenient way with a Money Back First-Time Pass Guarantee? Plus, you may be entitled to a $2000 rebate! So, what are you waiting for?

Click Here & Claim Your CME Credits Now!

Pediatric Board Study Tips for Pediatric Residents

A pediatric residency is three years, and during that time you can lose a lot of the good study habits and test-taking skills that you gained during medical school. And let’s face it—when you’re in your residency, you’re not always hitting the books. You’re probably working 80-hour weeks during your residency and it can seem impossible to get any studying done for the pediatric boards.

But there are small habits that you can get into during your residency that will better prepare you for your pediatric boards—little things that may not seem like much at the time, but they really do make a difference.

It’s easy to procrastinate and push the boards to the back of our minds because they’re not coming up right away. This is a bad strategy. The boards will happen at the end of your residency, and when they do come, you’re going to wish you had spent more time preparing for them.

So what can you do to study for your pediatric boards during your residency?

Studying For Your Pediatric Boards During Pediatric Inpatient Rotations

When you’re doing an inpatient pediatric rotation, you’re often moving at a frantic pace. You’re probably working with eight to ten patients, moving from one to the next (and the next and the next…). Here’s what you can do. Stop for a moment, maybe 1-3 minutes, to study the biggest problem with each patient.

You don’t even need to sit down at a computer. In the hall, pull up the PBR study guide on your phone and search for their primary condition, read a brief synopsis on the topic, or dive a little deeper if you have a problem that’s stumping you. This micro-studying approach will take very little time, but by the end of the shift you will have familiarized yourself with board-relevant information that you can also share during morning rounds to amaze your attending physician.

This process alone will put you ahead of 90% of the pack because most pediatric residents put off studying for their boards until the last possible moment. Then comes the mad scramble to relearn everything they’ve forgotten and learn about many new disorders they never even had the opportunity to encounter during residency.

Pediatric resident studying on a cell phone

Studying For Your Pediatric Boards During Elective Rotations

Pediatric board study tips for when you are on elective rotations revolve around using that time to read through at least one full chapter. There are some sections of the pediatric boards, like infectious disease, for example, that are in-depth and require some major study. While you’re working on an elective rotation, you’ll have more time to devote to entire chapters of the study guide—especially when it’s related to the elective rotation you’re working on. So, while you’re doing cardiology, study your pediatric cardiology chapter. While you’re doing a neonatology rotation, study your neonatology chapter.

It’s easier to learn about cardiology while you’re surrounded by cardiology patients and a cardiologist. It’s easier to learn about infectious disease while you’re immersed in an infectious diseases rotation and you have an attending physician to discuss topics with every day.

Maintain Your Studying Skills and Develop Test-Taking Skills

Test taking is about knowing the material and having good test-taking skills. You have to know the information, be good about time management, understand the question formats, and recognize patterns. While in medical school, you were a studier because that was your one job. Once you’re deep into residency, it can become very difficult to establish good study habits due to fatigue and distractions from your real job.

Since the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) initial certification exam will be the hardest exam of your life, it’s important to put in the right amount of time and effort to pass the exam. To best prepare, first off, use our Risk Calculator. This will determine your risk profile for failing the boards and provide a clear plan based on that profile. Here are some of the danger signs we look for in the Risk Calculator:

  • A history of struggling to pass ANY medical board exam
  • A history of board scores that are usually lower than the national average
  • Residency training at an “at risk” residency program
  • And there are more. (You can find our entire list of risk factors here.)

Once you know your risk profile, you can choose a study method that’s best for you. Our study guides emphasize three things: Content, Technique, and Commitment. All three are essential for you to pass the pediatric boards. You must know the content inside and out, which means that even a moderate amount of studying throughout your residency will help immensely. You must develop good testing technique, which means taking the time to understand how to process different types of board-style questions and then practicing your new test-taking skills until you master them. And, you must have the commitment to follow through with these things throughout your residency.

A three-year residency may seem like a long time to prepare for your boards, but it’s only useful if you are steadily doing some work during those years. This is not a test that you can cram for at the last minute.

Studying is Easier With a Partner

We know, through experience, that studying is considerably more effective if it’s done with a partner. So, we’ve prepared our programs with a considerable discount if a fellow resident signs up for our study guides with you. You’ll both have the benefit of our efficiency-driven study tools and materials, all for a lower price. Plus, you’ll have a partner to bounce ideas back and forth, get immediate feedback, quiz one another, and have much needed moral support. There’s no underestimating the value of a good study partner.

Make Use of Your Book Fund

If a book fund is available to you through your residency program, you can use those funds with Pediatric Board Review to get our courses and study guides. We are very accustomed to working with department staff to get orders processed quickly. This is a great way to maximize every dollar at your disposal!

Stretch Your Studying Over Years

If you’re a PGY1 or PGY2 needing access for multiple years, you can also get massive discounts through PBR. So, not only are you getting the benefit of starting your studying early during the early years of your pediatric residency training, but you’re able to save money too! It’s a win-win.

Over the last decade, PBR has helped over 10,000 pediatricians prepare for their board exams. We’re excited to help you on this journey!

Click Here & Learn More About Our Study Guides & Resident Packages!

What To Expect From the Pediatrics Board Exam

The pediatrics board exam is an essential component of your career in pediatrics, but, as with any standardized test, there’s more to the board exam than simply memorizing answers to thousands of questions. Successfully passing the exam comes from having a solid command of medical knowledge and test-taking strategies. This includes knowing what to expect on the day of the exam and doing everything possible to have a methodical approach to the big day.

So, here are some things that you can expect from Pediatrics Board Review (PBR) to help you prepare for your initial certification exam. For information on the ABP Maintenance of Certification (MOC) exam and MOCA-Peds, please visit our recertification page.

Risk Calculator Quiz

While the American Board of Pediatrics provides the ABP General Knowledge Self-Assessment, do not assume your results will act as a true indication of your ability to pass the initial certification exam. This assessment is more appropriate for the ABP Maintenance of Certification (MOC) exam, not the initial certification exam.

PBR’s free, online Risk Calculator Quiz will help you understand your risk profile of possibly failing the pediatric board exam and will place you as either low, moderate, or high risk.

Knowing your risk profile for the initial certification exam will give you a plan for how to move forward with your pediatrics exam. For example, pediatricians in the low-risk group will use the 300-hour study plan in the PBR Efficiency Blueprint, while those in the moderate-to-high risk groups will use the 500-hour study plan. Your plan will not only differ in how many hours you need to set aside for studying, but also how many times you'll review the material and whether improving your test-taking strategies should be a key point of focus.

In fact, we believe so strongly in the PBR Board Certification System that we offer a 100% Money Back First-Time Pass Guarantee.

For all of the risk categories, we have provided structure and guidance that will help you get to your goal of passing your pediatrics board exam. We help you with time management, community support, and we have a proven track record of success.

Did you know that PBR has helped pediatricians pass after as many as seven failed attempts? We even helped one pediatrician pass on his tenth attempt!

We can help you too.

Physician taking the pediatric boards exam

What Should You Expect from the Pediatrics Board Exam?

  • If you've never taken the exam before, you can go through a short tutorial before the exam begins. PBR members are trained to go through the ABP tutorial BEFORE the exam day. Keep in mind that this tutorial is technically for the ABP MOC exam. Initial certification exam test-takers SHOULD go through it because it’s almost the exact same tutorial seen on their exam day. The slight difference will be around the number of blocks that the tutorial mentions for the exam (the initial certification exam has four blocks rather than the two mentioned in this tutorial). Going through this tutorial before your exam can remove one point of stress at the beginning of a very important day.
  • According to the American Board of Pediatrics, you must arrive for your pediatrics board exam at least 30 minutes before your scheduled test time. If you arrive late, the test proctor may actually bar you from entering to take the exam, meaning that you'll have to pay a rescheduling fee and take the exam the following year.
  • When you arrive at the testing center to take your pediatrics initial certification exam or maintenance of certification exam, you'll initially be scanned for prohibited electronic devices and will need to show a valid ID to be admitted into the testing center. You'll be given a secure storage locker to stow away your personal belongings and effects. You'll also have to turn your pockets inside out to ensure that you're not carrying prohibited items, and you’ll be asked to roll up your sleeves to show that you're not wearing a wristwatch. After that, you'll be given two laminated note boards and two markers. Immediately before you enter the exam room, you'll be asked to sign your name and document the time.
  • After you've signed in for the exam, someone will escort you to a workstation where the exam will take place. You will be allowed to take in your photo ID, your storage locker key, earplugs, the two laminated note boards, and two markers. If you would also like to take something else into the room, you can check the Prometric pre-approved items list.
  • During the ABP initial certification exam, you will have four examination sections and 1 hour and 45 minutes to complete each section. PBR offers more in-depth advice on how to manage your time during your ABP exam.
  • You'll be monitored at all times while you're in the facility, and all testing sessions will have audio and video recorded. Testing advisors will also periodically walk through the exam room to monitor for any irregular behavior.
  • If you need any assistance, you can raise your hand for help. If you encounter a hardware or software problem while taking your exam, it's important to leave the message on your screen so that an exam official can determine the source of the error. You shouldn’t lose any testing time and your score shouldn't be affected because of any technical problems, but must communicate any such problems to a testing official as soon as possible.

If This Sounds Daunting, We Can Help!

So much of passing your boards comes down to not only your knowledge of medicine, but to your ability to take standardized tests under the very artificial environment mentioned above. This includes the development of your test-taking strategy, and it also includes understanding the many ways to optimize your test-week schedule, your test-day schedule, and yourself. PBR helps in all these areas with a team-based approach led by Dr. Ashish Goyal. Dr. Goyal is PBR’s author and he has coached members to success after as many as nine failed attempts.

Want to skyrocket your scores and get the greatest bang for your buck? We recommend:

PBR’s No Brainer Bundle

Increase your chances of board success to 95% with ALL of our pediatric knowledge base resources. You will get access to our hardcopy books, online editions of the books, audio course, video course, access to live ASK THE EXPERT webinars, a digital picture atlas, our Full Online Test-Taking Strategies Course, and even three 90-Day Personalized Study Schedules created just for you by Team PBR. The No Brainer is the BEST way to leverage your study time for maximum results.

What Else Can I Do?

One of the fastest ways to improve your chances of passing the pediatric boards is to develop your test-taking strategy. This isn’t a skill that everyone has, but Dr. Goyal can help you develop it.

Dr. Goyal will teach you how many questions are in each section and what kinds of questions to expect. He has also identified three major categories of questions that every ABP question will fall into, and he’s created algorithms to help you process each category of questions. He’s also discovered shortcuts to help get questions correct by identifying answer choices that are similar, opposite, contain “hard stop” words, contain “hedging” words, and those that are meant to leave you wondering why it feels like there are multiple correct answer choices.

You will learn all of this through PBR’s test-taking strategy courses. These courses have repeatedly been the key to success for professionals taking medical board exams, and they’ll help you too.

So, if you would like help preparing for your pediatrics board exam, look to the leader in this field here at Pediatrics Board Review (PBR). From helping you build your fund of knowledge the right way, to helping you with all the ins and outs of your exam day, we can help you pass your exam the very first time or your money back — guaranteed!

Become a “No Brainer” Bundle Member Today!

PEDIATRIC BOARD EXAM RESULTS FOR 2022 AND INSIGHTS FOR 2023

Pediatric Board Exam Results – 2022!

Well, friends, results of the 2022 pediatrics board exam have been announced! This is always an emotional time for pediatricians. For us here at PBR HQ, it's also overwhelming because we get flooded with emails from the members who have worked so hard over the past year, and have now FINALLY passed the boards!  
 
The stories from our 2022 members have been wonderful. To have members say that we have changed their lives has been nothing less than humbling. Our members are also providing feedback on making the resources we have even better so that the PBR system continues to be the best pediatric board review available. While we are known for being the premier resource for anyone at moderate to high risk of failing the pediatric boards, the results below will help you see that if we can help pediatricians pass after SIX failed attempts, then helping you pass the pediatric board exam should be easy. 

In this article, I’ll be covering: 

  • The pass rate for PBR members and first-time test takers 
  • Feedback from our board-certified alumni on how to pass the pediatric board exams 
  • Next Steps if you FAILED the boards (and common mistakes to avoid to make sure you pass next year) 
  • Free upcoming webinar on how to ensure you pass the 2023 pediatric boards

Click Here And Continue Reading…

Why AAP Prep Questions are NOT the Best Study Questions

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS (AAP) PREP DISCLAIMER

AAP PREP® QUESTIONS – WHEN YOU SHOULD (AND SHOULD NOT) USE THEM!

A question I’m often asked is “Ashish, what makes your pediatric study guide better than prep questions?” Whether they are talking about general board prep questions or the American Academy of Pediatrics PREP® questions, my answer is always the same (read on).Shhhh it's a secret!

THE SECRET NO ONE TALKS ABOUT WITH AAP PREP QUESTIONS

The AAP PREP questions are NOT written by the American BOARD of Pediatrics (ABP). They are written by the American ACADEMY of Pediatrics (AAP). The names of these organizations are so similar (American ______ Pediatrics), that MANY pediatricians believe that they are one and the same.

THEY ARE NOT!

Yet, the AAP's annual question series has somehow become the “go-to” Q&A resources for the pediatric boards.

Many pediatricians tend to use AAP PREP questions exclusively as their source of study for the boards. I'm baffled by this. While PREP is a great resource for anyone who is a board-certified pediatrician looking for Continuing Medical Education (CME), or for any non-board certified pediatrician trying to simulate an ABP practice session, these questions should NOT be used as a primary study resource while studying for the ABP initial certification exam.

THE MOST COMMON REASON PEDIATRICIANS FAIL THE PEDIATRIC BOARDS

Here is a note I received from a PBR alum, now a Board Certified Pediatrician, who made one of the most dangerous test-taking mistakes the year that she failed her pediatric boards:

Hello Ashish, Last year I failed my boards. I spent countless hours studying using prep questions but didn't have one good source to use to really learn from and I thought using questions would be my key to success. Unfortunately, I was wrong. I was so lost and frustrated after I received that FAIL, and I thought there is no way that I was going to pass. I had spent hours and months studying… What more could I have done?!? I googled ‘failed pediatric boards' and PBR came up. It was an answer to prayer. It was exactly what I needed. I was blown away by the help that PBR gave me. From the PBR book itself to the videos, audio and online portals – I am so incredibly thankful. I think PBR should be adopted by residency programs nationwide as it would be a great resource to have to study for in-training exams and to use alongside rotations. Just my two cents!! If there is something that I could do to help you and the PBR membership, please let me know!
Dr. Stephanie Moses, Board Certified Pediatrician

Learn from Stephanie’s experience; it takes more than questions to pass the pediatric board exam. There are three pillars I like to refer to when it comes to successfully passing the boards:

  1. CONTENT: How well you know the material.
  2. TECHNIQUE: How to quickly and effectively process board-style questions.
  3. COMMITMENT: How disciplined you are to the process.

You can read more about these pillars in my article covering the 3 must-have ingredients to passing the pediatric boards.

In order to succeed on the boards, you have to separate your board prep time into two buckets. Your CONTENT TIME (the time to develop your knowledge base) and your TECHNIQUE TIME (the time to develop your test-taking strategy).

“Click

Failed But Then Finally Passed With PBR TTS and Coaching

Again, the AAP has put together a GREAT resource. I actually think it stands above all others in the marketplace for simulating the board exam experience. It's also wonderful for pediatric continuing medical education (CME). However, it should NEVER be used as a standalone resource for board study. I simply cannot imagine that the AAP would ever cover all of pediatrics as a comprehensive board review in a set of 200-300 questions.

STEPHANIE FOCUSED ON QUESTIONS, AND FAILED THE BOARDS

Dr. Stephanie Moses is now a board-certified pediatrician practicing emergency medicine. But, that wasn't always the case. In the video below, she talks about the advice that she received and how she focused on PREP the first time that she took the boards. Her second experience was very different. What she says is amazing. Watch the video below now, and be sure to watch until the end.

HOW MANY AAP PREP QUESTIONS SHOULD I DO?

In short, you should do at least 5 practice questions per day in addition to your studying materials. These should be from PREP as well as from other Q banks. This way, you are able to get a taste of various question flavors and have a broad understanding of how questions can be written for the boards. Read my article called “How Many AAP Prep Questions Should I Do?” and learn more about why I recommend this.

When it comes to how many questions you should do before taking your boards, the answer is “it depends.” At the end of the day, answering board-style questions is a skill. You can only answer so many questions before you reach a plateau. Once you do that, the rest of your time should be spent on maintaining your newly developed test-taking skill. For most physicians, though, having “skill” at taking a board exam is a foreign concept. However, through PBR's test-taking strategy courses, we've proven that investing a fraction of your time in learning the technique behind processing and answering board-style questions can produce unbelievable results.

PBR members have gone from previous failing up to six times to finally passing and becoming board certified by the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP). Click here now and learn more about PBR's test-taking strategy courses to see which one is right for you.

MORE THINGS TO KEEP IN MIND

Here are a few additional key points about using the AAP's questions, as well as any other board prep questions:

  • If you insist on using questions to study, pick a company that creates study materials for the boards as well. This will (hopefully) ensure that the questions actually correlate with the content you need to know for the boards. This way, the answers/explanations tie in seamlessly with the core content necessary to pass the boards. However, finding this magical batch of questions that will give you everything you need to know for the boards typically does not exist. That’s why it's IMPERATIVE to study from a well-written and easy-to-understand study guide and to use questions for the practice of your test-taking TECHNIQUE.
  • The boards are not always current! PREP does a great job of staying current, but the ABP questions you'll see on the boards are not always that up to date. So BE CAREFUL.
  • PREP answers/explanations often go into excellent detail to explain all possible viewpoints. When you're studying for the boards, EFFICIENCY IS KEY so SKIM the answers. If you answered the question correctly, pat yourself on the back and MOVE ON! If you answered the question incorrectly, focus only on the answer that you chose and also on the answer that was the correct answer. Figure out where you went wrong. Was it a TECHNIQUE problem, or was it purely a CONTENT problem? If you felt like you had a good handle on the subject matter but still answered the question incorrectly, it was definitely a TECHNIQUE problem and you must figure out how to strengthen your test-taking strategies.

PREP is a great tool when used correctly

So, to answer the question posed in the title of this article, “Ashish, what makes your pediatric study guide better than prep questions?”, it’s near impossible to find ANY board prep questions that would do a good job of serving as a stand-alone STUDY resource.

Yes, you will undoubtedly learn some information about pediatrics by going through board prep questions. But your primary goal should be to use prep questions for PRACTICE and refinement of your test-taking TECHNIQUE rather than a STUDY resource.

THEN, HOW DO I STUDY FOR THE PEDIATRIC BOARD EXAM?

Set time aside to specifically grow your knowledge base and work on your test-taking technique. If you aren’t sure how to create such a schedule, I have two articles with step-by-step directions on how to set up your study schedule. Regardless of how much time you have left before the boards, these articles are great resources!

If you consider yourself to be a great test-taker, or if you are taking the boards for the first time, follow this schedule.

If you have failed the boards before (welcome to the club!), or if you are not a great test-taker, then follow this study schedule.

For those who are wanting to take that next step to pass the boards, the go-to resource is Pediatrics Board Review. As a PBR member, you’ll have access to high-yield board review questions and our test-taking strategy resources!

To get the most out of our catalog of study materials, we created the No Brainer package. The No Brainer package is the most common bundle used by our members to prepare for, and pass, the Initial Certification Exam. It provides you with a comprehensive and multimodal approach to studying. It also includes three 90-Day Personalized Schedules created by Team PBR and our Full Online Test-Taking Strategies Course.

Not a PBR member yet? What are you waiting for? Click here now & to find the right PBR resource for you!

Passing the Pediatric Boards – The 3 MUST HAVE Ingredients

The 3 MUST HAVE Ingredients for Board Success

3 Key Ingredients to Passing the Pediatric BoardsPassing the the pediatric boards is challenging, but it's far from magic. In this article I'm going to introduce you to the 3 main areas you must focus on to pass the boards. If you don't, then even as a good pediatrician you will be at high risk for failing the boards.

By the end, you will have a much better handle on the general framework within which you will need to focus your energy. I predict that it's going to be quite liberating for you!

Let's start with a few stories…

Each year after the pediatric board results are released, I ask PBR members for feedback. “How was it for you?” The replies vary considerably, but there are specific overwhelming emotions which come through time and time again;

Relief

a big weight has been lifted off my shoulders and I feel lighter and free.”

– “Dr. Wiseman”

Celebration

“My family and I celebrated all day long. We cried tears of happiness knowing the endless hours of studying are over AND payed off!”

– “Shy Doc”

Gratitude Click Here And Continue Reading…