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Category Archives for "Pediatric Mnemonics"

2013 Pediatrics Board Review Corrections and Clarifications

50-70 Pages of FREE High-Yield Content Now Available!

In 2012, the Pediatrics Board Review Corrections & Clarifications Guide was only about 25 pages. The guide contained corrections that I found and that others found in the 2nd edition of the Pediatrics Board Review Core Study Guide. The guide provided a TON of value and helped many people correctly answer questions they would have otherwise gotten wrong! I think there's still value in reviewing it today because these guides give me the freedom to write freely about pretty much anything related to topics, studying for the boards, etc.

Want the 2012 guide? Just click LIKE below and then download it (Sorry! As of Sept. 2014, the LIKE software no longer works… so I'm now just giving it away! Just click on the image to download the guide. It would be GREAT if you could visit https://www.facebook.com/PedsBoardReview and give it a LIKE).
2013-3rd-Edition-PBR-3D-Book-Cover-CORRECTIONS

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Creating Memorable Pediatric Mnemonics

Pediatric Mnemonics that Stick

Overwhelmed by informationAs doctors, most of us were in the top 10% of our class until we hit medical school, but that doesn't mean it’s easy for us to retain the vast amounts of knowledge necessary to pass the pediatric boards. I remember the overwhelming feeling of being crushed by all of the information I was being bombarded with during my studies.

It wasn't until I learned how to create pediatric mnemonics and memory aids that I was finally able to feel comfortable with the idea of housing all of that information in my brain. The mnemonics I created were essential in helping me retain information and pass the USMLE Step exams as well as the pediatric initial certification exam.

So, unless you’ve got a photographic memory, I’d highly recommend spending some time learning memory techniques.

The [PBR] mnemonics were stellar, if not a little goofy , but that just added to their utility. I will likely remember some the mnemonics for the rest of my life, especially the autosomal dominant diseases. – Dr. Kristen Macleod” – Read Kristen's full testimonial by clicking HERE.

WHAT ARE MNEMONICS?

Rainbow - ROY G BIVIn a nutshell, mnemonics are memory aid devices that can help you to remember difficult to absorb information.

Does the name ROY G BIV sound familiar? Click Here And Continue Reading…

ANSWER for, “What’s The Diagnosis In This Child With Lower Extremity Pain?”

To see the question, CLICK HERE.

ANSWERS:

1. Can you name the disorder?
The disorder shown in these images is EWING'S SARCOMA. Ewing’s Sarcoma is a tumor of the long bones. A long bone is any bone that’s longer than it is wide. During your pediatric board review and on the pediatric boards, look for questions associated with X-rays of the humerus, femur, tibia or fibula.
 
EDUCATIONAL PEARLS FOR YOUR PEDIATRIC BOARD REVIEW:

Achondroplasia Mnemonic Images

Recognize this guy? It's Weeman. He was born with achondroplasia.

Mini-Me also has achondroplasia.

Now imagine these two devilishly bad guys making trouble as they carry around a TRIDENT to remind you of the trident-like fingers.

You could also imagine this little guy having achondroplasia.

Want to learn more about achondroplasia? CLICK HERE

 Did that help? If so, what are you waiting for?

Pediatrics Board Review Core Study Guide

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ANSWER: What Condition Does Mini-Me Have?

 
 
1. What movie is this guy from?: 
Mini-Me is a character played by Verne Troyer in the second and third Austin Powers movies: Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me and Austin Powers in Goldmember. I actually think I liked the original one best.
 
2. What disorder does he have?
Verne Troyer has ACHONDROPLASIA! This is also known as the most common form of DWARFISM. Patients are short, have macrocephaly, mild hypotonia, short arms/legs, a relatively NORMAL TORSO and “trident-like” fingers. 
 
3. What's the inheritance pattern?
About 15-20% of cases are due to autosomal dominant inheritance. The rest are due to SPORADIC mutations.
 
Want to see a couple of mnemonic images? CLICK HERE in 2 days.
 

 Did that help? If so, what are you waiting for?

Pediatrics Board Review Core Study Guide

Your tool for efficiency and
guaranteed success!