Ashish Goyal, M.D.
Ashish Goyal, M.D.

Author Archives: Ashish Goyal, M.D.

American Board of Pediatrics Accommodations for Extra Time

Getting Special Test Center Accommodations for Your Exam

Running out of Time? Get American Board of Pediatrics Accommodations for Extra Time!

Are you aware of the various American Board of Pediatrics accommodations that are available? These test accommodations are designed for pediatricians who have specific needs, and they can result in you getting twice the amount of time to take the test.

Do you have specific needs when it comes to taking tests? Do you suffer from a condition covered by the ADA or Americans with Disabilities Act and subsequent ADAAA guidelines? Perhaps a condition which is going to leave you struggling for time on the boards?

If so, you might qualify for some amazing special accommodations, such as:

  • Extra time to take your exam
  • A private testing room away from all other test-takers
  • Extended break times

This article will give you the steps you need to pursue to get the special accommodations. We’ll cover important details about why the ABP offers test accommodations, which accommodations are available to you, how to apply, and most importantly – when you must apply to receive test accommodations for your board exam.

Why Does the ABP Offer Test Accommodations?

Like many standardized board exams, the American Board of Pediatrics exam must comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act (ADAAA) for people who have documented disabilities or a need for test accommodations.

Many people suffer from some sort of medical or neuropsychological condition which creates a hindrance to test taking. Test accommodations are intended to give everyone an equal chance at passing the board exams. 

American Board of Pediatrics Accommodations - Balancing the Scales

If you believe that you may qualify for a test accommodation, Click Here And Continue Reading…

Passing the Pediatric Board Exam – Maximizing CRUNCH Time

Don't have any regrets!When it comes to passing the pediatric board exam, all logic and reason can get thrown out the window during “crunch time.”

In this article, I want to share some resources and tips to help you calm the nerves, help you focus on maximizing your chances at passing the pediatric boards and most of all… ensure that at the end of the test-taking process you have absolutely NO REGRETS!

What Should I Do When It's “Crunch Time?”

Well, let’s answer all the following questions:

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS (AAP) PREP DISCLAIMER

  • Should I Be Doing A Ton Of PREP Questions?
  • What Are The Best Pediatric Board Review Books For Me To Study?
  • What’s the BIGGEST “Bang For The Buck” At CRUNCH TIME?
  • What’s the ONE THING I Can Do to LEARN MORE EFFECTIVELY?
  • What Should I Do If I Have Questions About A Topic That’s Confusing Me?
  • Is Passing the Pediatric Board Exam Realistic for Me?

Should I Be Doing A Ton Of PREP Questions?

I answer this question in detail in a Pediatrics Board Review article titled, “How Many AAP PREP Questions Should I Do?

In summary, the idea behind using ANY sort of board questions should be for PRACTICE. It is NOT to learn board-relevant content. For that, you should be focusing on a single, primary study resource (called the PBR).

This means that you don’t aim to learn new content from those questions. Your aim should be to practice your test-taking SKILLS. When I refer to “test taking skills,” I mean…

  • Are you falling for traps?
  • Are you reading the English within the actual question carefully?
  • Are you extracting the appropriate information from the clinical vignette?
  • Are you keeping a steady pace, and able to LET GO of a question when it is one that is…
    • Taking you forever to think through?
    • About a topic that you KNOW you are weak in?
    • Is SUPER long?

“Click

Passing the board exam requires a blend of strong board-relevant clinical knowledge, plus test-taking skills. Many physicians do not realize this and they continue to fail over and over again. They assume that board questions are like miniature patients, but they are not! Click Here And Continue Reading…

Need a Step-By-Step Pediatric Board Study Schedule?

Trust me… You DO Need A Schedule!

Map out Your Study ScheduleIn the article titled “Need a Pediatric Board Study Plan?” I talk about how important it is to commit enough time to your studies. 

I often get asked questions like…

Can you provide a general pediatric board study schedule?”

I'm in practice, can you provide me with a pediatric board study plan that works for me?

Can you provide a pediatric board study schedule for those of us in fellowship?

For first-time test takers who usually score ABOVE the national mean on their board exams, I recommend a MINIMUM of 2-300+ hours, and a MINIMUM of 3 rounds of reading all of the “core” Pediatrics Board Review material.

Please remember, though, a schedule is only as valuable as your DETERMINATION to follow it. In this article, I breakdown those 300 hours into a manageable, concrete schedule that you can use to guide your studies. Click Here And Continue Reading…

Pediatric Board Exam Results for 2014

The Exam Results For 2014 Are In!

I can’t believe the pediatric board exam results for 2014 are already here, and so early this year! Based on the emails I'm getting, it was a GREAT year to take the exam. Since I failed the first time I took the boards, I’m especially happy to hear that PBR made the difference for SO many repeat exam takers who previously failed the pediatric boards. It wasn’t all good news, though, and my heart really goes out to those who didn’t make the mark.

 

Click Here And Continue Reading…

2014 Pediatrics Board Review Corrections and Clarifications

50-60 Pages of High-Yield Content Now Available!

I never realized that the release of the annual creation of the Pediatrics Board Review Corrections & Clarifications Guide would become such a big deal. It started off as a 25-page document in 2012 that I sent out to the PBR membership as a courtesy, and now it's something that the membership essentially begs me for! The 2014 Guide is now available and it's towards the BOTTOM of this article. If you submitted at least 7 errors, helped with at least 5 lookups, or you're a PBR For LIFE! member, you should've gotten this for FREE already 🙂 – Thank YOU!

Want the the 2012 and 2013 guides for FREE? Just email us to upgrade to PBR For LIFE! Since this is a BONUS for PBR For LIFE! members, it's not something I can just give away for free… BUT, if you “pay” for it with a Facebook LIKE… it's yours!

2012 Corrections & Clarifications Guide

[sociallocker id=”3736″] PBR 2012 Corrections and Clarifications
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$5 for the 2012 Corrections & Clarifications Guide

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2013 Corrections & Clarifications Guide

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2013 Pediatrics Board Review Corrections and Clarifications

 

 

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$10

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2014 Annual PBR Corrections & Clarifications Guide

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2014 Edition of the PBR Corrections and Clarifications

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$10

Click Here And Continue Reading…

Pediatric Board Questions – 3 Strategies to Skyrocket Your Score!

ARE TEST QUESTIONS LIKE MINI-PATIENTS?

Doctor Examining ComputerNO! Pediatric board questions are NOT like mini-patients.

Don’t believe me? Well, by the end of this article you’re going to:

  1. Learn the difference between real life patients and test patients
  2. Learn 3 strategies towards correctly answering board-style questions that you can put into practice IMMEDIATELY to increase your board score
  3. Become familiar with free and paid resources at your disposal to help you work on your test-taking techniques
  4. Feel inspired to approach board-style questions as 75-second puzzles rather than stressful patient encounters

A SAMPLE PEDIATRIC BOARD REVIEW QUESTION

How would you proceed with the little girl below? It’s a short question, so please set your timer to 60 seconds, read the question below and commit to ONE answer choice. 

A 3-year-old female toddler presents for a routine well child visit. You note an abdominal mass on exam. You suspect the child may have a Wilms tumor. There have not been any urinary symptoms, but urine dipstick shows evidence of blood. There’s a history of breast cancer in the family. 

Which of the following is the most appropriate diagnostic test to determine the cause of the patient’s abdominal mass?

A. CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis

B. Complete urinalysis

C. Oncology referral

D. Biopsy of the mass

E. BRCA gene testing

Click Here And Continue Reading…

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